CLINICAL TRIAL

Treatment for Lung Cancer

1 Prior Treatment
Relapsed
Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Detroit, MI

This study is evaluating whether different methods of quitting smoking are more effective than others.

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About the trial for Lung Cancer

Eligible Conditions
Smoking, Cessation · Lung Neoplasms

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 3 different treatments. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Control Group 1
Removal of Financial Barriers
BEHAVIORAL
Control Group 2
Removal of Financial Barriers
BEHAVIORAL
+
Financial Incentives
BEHAVIORAL
+
Mobile Health Application
BEHAVIORAL
Control Group 3
Removal of Financial Barriers
BEHAVIORAL
+
Financial Incentives
BEHAVIORAL

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. You must have received 1 prior treatment for Lung Cancer or the other condition listed above. There are 6 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
People who show up to a radiology location affiliated with a participating health system for the LDCT, or have a valid email address or telephone number on file with the health system, are able to receive study invitation and screening. show original
can be very helpful in a crisis Having access to a cell phone with text messaging or the internet can be very helpful in a crisis show original
An adult is someone who is 18 years or older. show original
A person who smokes at least one cigarette per day, not including e-cigarettes, is considered a current smoker. show original
Has a low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scan ordered by their physician
People who live in an underserved area, which is an area that has a high population of black, hispanic, rural residents, or people with a low socioeconomic status, often have difficulty accessing healthcare services. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months,12 months
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months,12 months
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months,12 months.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 1 primary outcome and 7 secondary outcomes in patients with Lung Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of 6 months.

Biochemically confirmed smoking abstinence sustained for 6 months
6 MONTHS
The primary outcome measure is sustained abstinence for 6 months, and will require self-report of smoking cessation followed by biochemical confirmation at 2 weeks, 3, and 6 months.
6 MONTHS
Motivation to quit
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
The Stages of Change (SOC) is a validated 1-item measure to assess patient's self-reported motivation to quit.
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
Perceived barriers to cessation
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
The Challenges to Stopping Smoking Scale (CSS-21) is a validated 21-item measure to assess patients' perceived barriers to smoking cessation. The CSS-21 has two sub-scales: intrinsic factors (physical, psychological or cognitive aspects of quitting) and extrinsic factors (social or environmental aspects of quitting).
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
Health-related quality of life
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
The EuroQuol Group's quality of life (EQ-5D) scale is a 25-item validated scale used to assess patients' perceived health-related quality of life across the domains of mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression.
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
Self-efficacy related to cessation efforts
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
We will use the 10-item situational measure of self-efficacy related to smoking behavior. This scale measures how sure participants are that they can avoid smoking in different situations.
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
Temporal ("delay") discounting
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
Temporal discounting is a measure of impulsivity that reflects people's tendencies to discount the value of a reward as a function of how far in the future it would be received. We will use the 5-Trial Adjusting Delay Task to assess temporal discounting.
BASELINE, 6 MONTHS, 12 MONTHS
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Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What is lung cancer?

There were no cases of small solid nodules or nodular sclerosis that were found that were thought to have been lung cancer not just on the radiograph but also the physical examination of the patient. The most common cause of a solid nodule that resulted in lung cancer was an inflammatory lung disease, such as Sjögren syndrome or connective tissue disease. The second most common cause of a solid nodule that resulted in lung cancer was a lung cancer, such as a typical or atypical pulmonary malignancy or lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get lung cancer a year in the United States?

Each year, about 870,000 people, in the United States are diagnosed with [lung cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/lung-cancer). This makes it the second most common cause of cancer-related death, behind skin cancer (3,000 lung cancer related deaths in the US). Lung cancer is the most lethal form of cancer in the US, as an estimated 250 people die of the disease in every day in America. Preventable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, also contribute to this disease.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of lung cancer?

Signs of [lung cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/lung-cancer) include sputum changes (i.e.bloody or purulent) and persistent cough. If either of them are present, cancer could easily be overlooked before diagnosis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes lung cancer?

Lung cancer develops mainly from genetic mutations which occur during the cell division process of the normal cells in the lungs. Many genes that control these processes are abnormal in different cancers. The main signs of lung cancer in smokers are a fast-growing tumour and the occurrence of a second tumour as a result of an excessive amount of smoke. There is also a greater risk of developing cancer in the lungs of male children who are exposed to cigarette smoke in early childhood.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for lung cancer?

More than half of patients diagnosed with lung cancer receive treatment, but only approximately a third of patients with active lung cancer report any improvement in symptoms or lung function following treatment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can lung cancer be cured?

(It still takes too much time until I get cured) I will start to receive a cure immediately if I start to feel the symptoms of cancer. If the symptoms start to disappear, I will stop using the treatments that cause the most harm to me. If I had a cure, I would donate half of the cure money to the charity that is giving me a cure. The rest of the money that I owe my family to be able to live a normal life, I can pay using the charity cure.  (It would take time till a cure is received but if I live another 2 years,I will have a curing to repay my family even if one of the treatments gives me a cure.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What does treatment usually treat?

Stage 4 lung cancer can be cured with surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy as well as palliative care and symptomatic treatment of symptoms. In stage 4 NSCLC, the stage is associated with prognosis and treatment choices.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the latest research for lung cancer?

Although no specific new pharmaceutical agents have been FDA approved, other treatments have been approved for use in stage IV disease. It is important to note that these treatments are used in only a few select patients. For most patients with stage IV disease, the only option for treatment consists of chemotherapy, either combined with radiation therapy or on its own. Recently, new chemotherapeutic agents have been developed for use in patients with specific mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor. Although their effectiveness is still being assessed in clinical trials, they may offer patients who have certain types of EGFR-mediated tumors a chance of responding favorably to treatment, if at all.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for lung cancer?

Current practice of considering clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should be reconsidered in light of the poor prognostic characteristics of patients with adenocarcinoma. Patients whose disease progresses or who are not amenable to surgery should be assessed for SCLC to assess their eligibility for clinical trials focused at reducing treatment toxicities by targeted approaches to specific histological subtypes of NSCLC. Clinically fit, elderly patients, with poor PS and with locally advanced NSCLC might benefit from clinical trials focusing on new agents and targeted therapies against specific histological subtypes of NSCLC which are likely to have a better prognosis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is treatment?

Findings from a recent study shows the use of a novel tool that enables clinical practitioners to examine the appropriateness of treatments, and their potential benefit to the patient. The study showed the value of applying a tool in guiding clinicians as part of a patient interaction model rather than as a standalone guideline.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving treatment?

Since the first trial involving lung cancer treatment with radiotherapy, we could say that there have been at least 10 trials; however, we do not know if all of them had the same objectives and reported what was actually measured. In addition, because all lung cancer trials may differ from each other, in essence, their results cannot be generalized. Clinical trials of treatment should be conducted more often to find some certainty whether a treatment is effective or ineffective.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the survival rate for lung cancer?

Survival rates for lung cancer were improving over the last 10-15 years, with the most marked progress for small cell lung cancer. More so than for nonsmall cell lung cancer, mortality and long-term survival after radical surgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer were better in the modern era, which was characterized by a number of factors, including earlier staging of the disease, more effective chemotherapy regimens, advances in surgical techniques and, possibly, less-invasive screening methods. Survival after surgery for NSCLC was the closest to the modern era, although survival rates after surgery declined when the stage of the disease was advanced.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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