CLINICAL TRIAL

Laryngoscopy for Head Neoplasms

Class III
Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Houston, TX

This study is evaluating whether a flexible scope or a video laryngoscope may help prevent complications from placing a breathing tube in patients with head and neck cancer.

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About the trial for Head Neoplasms

Eligible Conditions
Head and Neck Neoplasms · Neoplasms, Head and Neck

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Laryngoscopy is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Tracheal Intubation
PROCEDURE
Laryngoscopy
DEVICE
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Tracheal Intubation
PROCEDURE

About The Treatment

Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Tracheal Intubation
2021
N/A
~430
Laryngoscopy
2019
N/A
~480

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
will have an awake fiberoptic nasal intubation (AFOIN) All patients who are scheduled for head and neck surgery and who are at risk for a difficult airway, based on their Mallampati score, neck circumference, sternomental distance, thyromental distance, mouth opening, and BMI, will have an awake fiberoptic nasal intubation. show original
The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grades anesthesiology care on a scale from I to IV show original
This sentence means that the person has given written permission for something to happen. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: 1 day
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 1 day
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: 1 day.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
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- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Laryngoscopy will improve 1 primary outcome and 5 secondary outcomes in patients with Head Neoplasms. Measurement will happen over the course of 1 day.

Incidence of desaturation
1 DAY
1 DAY
Rates of difficult endotracheal tube (ETT) placement
1 DAY
Estimated rates of difficult ETT will be provided using exact 95% confidence interval (CI) using the method of Clopper-Pearson.
1 DAY
Total time for securing the airway
1 DAY
1 DAY
Number of attempts required for intubation
1 DAY
1 DAY
Rate of failure at intubation
1 DAY
1 DAY
Complications of difficult Endotracheal Tube (ETT) placement using a flexible intubation scope (FIS) versus a combination of flexible intubation and video laryngoscopy in difficult airway management.
1 DAY
For complications, researchers will assign a '0' for no complication arising and a '1' for any complications arising. The total score will range from 0 to 3 and will be summarized using frequencies and percentages related to each level of the total score and using the mean score and standard deviation, whichever is more appropriate.
1 DAY

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can head neoplasms be cured?

Treatment-associated complications of surgery and radiotherapy are significant long-term threats to patient well-being, which can preclude a complete cure. The development of neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies targeting brain tumors, including molecular inhibitors aimed at oncogenic driver genes and vaccines against tumor-associated antigens may help control the tumor burden and, ultimately, reduce adverse events related to brain cancer therapy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes head neoplasms?

Some causes are not currently recognised as potential causes of head neoplasms. They may be due to factors that are commonly associated with a higher risk of head neoplasms or have different pathogenetic mechanisms of tumourigenesis. These cases should be recorded and considered along with a discussion of the possible contribution of specific exposures.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of head neoplasms?

Tumor-related changes in the cranial cavity can be suspected in patients with intracranial masses that have characteristic symptoms and signs. This is especially the case with cerebral metastases, which often mimic intracranial gliomas.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is head neoplasms?

Head neoplasms are any cancer that forms or spreads to the head. Head neoplasms can occur in many parts of the brain or neck, or may occur in bone marrow or lymph nodes. Brain tumors form in cells from the brain, while head neoplasms of the neck start in other parts of the body. There are several specific types of brain tumors, including gliomas, medulloblastomas, and ependymomas, among others. Lymphoma forms within the lymph nodes, while tumors of the bone marrow are made from cells that build up in marrow tissue. There are many different types of head and neck cancers.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for head neoplasms?

Generally, therapy for head neoplasms is supportive, with the goals of minimizing symptoms and maintaining quality of life. As with any illness with significant symptomatology, it is important to carefully consider patient preference, and thus, should be flexible in terms of therapy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get head neoplasms a year in the United States?

Head and neck cancers account for around 19% of all new cancer cases annually in the United States. More than 2,500 new cases of cancer are diagnosed per year in the United States in this body system. A number of important factors influence the risk of developing head and neck lesions. These include environmental factors, lifestyle and genetics. The information provided can help clinicians recognize, treat and prevent cancer in an individual patient. Head and neck cancers can have devastating effects on quality of life and can potentially result in death.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does head neoplasms run in families?

This is the first report on the association of HNPF with any type of head and neck neoplasms in the Iranian population. Results from a recent clinical trial do not support the contention that the familial form of the disease exists in this ethnic group. However, we believe that other factors in the patients' environment will be the reasons for such inheritance for head and neck cancers in Iranian population.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the common side effects of laryngoscopy?

Laryngoscopy, when carried out for diagnostic reasons, rarely leads to complications, and complications from the procedure are infrequent. For example, a minority of patients experience pneumothorax, and almost all patients experience dysphagia after laryngoscopy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the latest developments in laryngoscopy for therapeutic use?

Laryngoscopy can be performed by and used by doctors with very limited skill for many purposes. The main aim of this technique is not to allow the use of high quality cameras. This involves the use of a light source with a small field of vision which ensures that only the required portion of the patient's face is illuminated. These techniques allow the patient to see themself at work as he or she undergoes surgery under local anaesthetic with the camera being used as a guide to locate the correct spot. To date, more techniques have been developed by clinicians to increase patient comfort and reduce complications from the surgery.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Has laryngoscopy proven to be more effective than a placebo?

Both laryngoscopy patients and their physicians were satisfied with their results. Data from a recent study suggest that laryngoscopy is an effective method for diagnosing laryngeal cancer when used by appropriately trained and licensed clinicians.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating head neoplasms?

There have been no changes made in the treatment of head malignant tumors during the past year according to medical literature. One of the reasons may be the fact that there hasn't been a new discovery of a more powerful radiation. Another possibility is that researchers want to be more careful in their conclusions since the number of new case studies they read in the literature is much lower.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does laryngoscopy improve quality of life for those with head neoplasms?

For those with head tumors, quality of life is affected by symptomatology and treatment. Future studies should evaluate whether improvement of this factor following surgical resection may improve quality of life.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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