CLINICAL TRIAL

Vocal-cord Radiotherapy for Cancer of Larynx

Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Houston, TX

Vocal-cord vs. Complete Laryngeal Radiotherapy for Early Glottic Cancer

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About the trial for Cancer of Larynx

Eligible Conditions
Glottis Tumor · Laryngeal Cancer · Neck Cancer · Laryngeal Neoplasms

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Vocal-cord Radiotherapy is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 2 and have already been tested with other people.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Vocal-cord Radiotherapy
RADIATION
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Complete Larynx Radiotherapy
RADIATION

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 5 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Biopsy-confirmed squamous cell carcinoma, including verrucous carcinoma
Patient not candidate for laser surgery or declined laser surgery
Stage T1a-b N0 of the true vocal cords planned for definitive RT
Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2
Ability to provide written informed consent.
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: At 2- and 5-year follow-up
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: At 2- and 5-year follow-up
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: At 2- and 5-year follow-up.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Vocal-cord Radiotherapy will improve 1 primary outcome and 10 secondary outcomes in patients with Cancer of Larynx. Measurement will happen over the course of Week 0 post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up.

Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V)
WEEK 0 POST-TREATMENT AND AT 6-MONTH FOLLOW-UP
The attributes of CAPE-V are: (a) Overall Severity; (b) Roughness; (c) Breathiness; (d) Strain; (e) Pitch; and (f) Loudness. Each attribute is displayed accompanied by a 100- millimeter line forming a visual analog scale, with a higher score representing more deviant voice attributes.
WEEK 0 POST-TREATMENT AND AT 6-MONTH FOLLOW-UP
Rates of chronic toxicity as per CTCAE v5.0
AT 6-MONTH, 1-YEAR, 2-YEAR AND 5-YEAR POST-TREATMENT
AT 6-MONTH, 1-YEAR, 2-YEAR AND 5-YEAR POST-TREATMENT
Rates of cerebrovascular event (transient ischemic attack or stroke)
AT 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
AT 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
Overall survival
AT 2- AND 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
AT 2- AND 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory score
WEEK 0 POST-TREATMENT, AND AT 2-MONTH, 6-MONTH, 1-YEAR AND 2-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
Overall score ranges from 0 to 100, with higher score representing better functioning and quality of life.
WEEK 0 POST-TREATMENT, AND AT 2-MONTH, 6-MONTH, 1-YEAR AND 2-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
Voice Handicap Index-10 score
WEEK 0 POST-TREATMENT, AND AT 2-MONTH, 6-MONTH, 1-YEAR AND 2-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
Scores are rated on a 0-4 scale to indicate the presence and severity of the symptoms. Lower scores represent better functioning and quality of life.
WEEK 0 POST-TREATMENT, AND AT 2-MONTH, 6-MONTH, 1-YEAR AND 2-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
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Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
H. B.
Houda Bahig, Clinical Investigator
Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM)

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What does vocal-cord radiotherapy usually treat?

Results from a recent clinical trial provides a comprehensive overview of the clinical findings, treatment modalities, and prognoses of laryngeal carcinoma treated with vocal-cord radiotherapy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Is vocal-cord radiotherapy safe for people?

Vocal cord irradiation is a safe treatment for laryngeal cancer. It is associated with a very low incidence of post-treatment dysphagia. The main limitations of this study are small sample sizes. Laryngoscope, 2009.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is cancer of larynx?

Laryngeal cancer is a cancer that forms in the larynx and cause uncontrolled, rapid cell growth. It has a high risk of becoming metastatic and spreading to distant sites. Tissue samples from laryngeal cancer are usually tested for HPV infection, while scans may detect tumors in the larynx for more specialized cancer diagnosis. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are used to treat patients as well. Patients with laryngeal cancer may receive palliative care, in-vivo radiation as well as treatment with targeted therapies for metastases to other vital organs.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can cancer of larynx be cured?

The cure rate for laryngeal cancer seems to be high in most cases but still a small number of patients will develop recurrent cancer requiring multimodality treatment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes cancer of larynx?

Tobacco smoke caused more than 90% of cases. Environmental hazards, such as exposure to second-hand smoke and alcohol, increased the risk of non-cancer of larynx. Cancer of larynx was likely caused by viral infections. Smoking is the number one cause of the illness. The use of tobacco has been on the rise for centuries, especially as people have increased their consumption of this carcinogen for tobacco. As tobacco use increases, so do the rates of non-cancer of larynx and cancers of larynx. Tobacco causes many non-cancer of larynx such as laryngeal tumours.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get cancer of larynx a year in the United States?

This research provides a preliminary profile of the frequency of cancer of larynx in the US. We found a number of intriguing differences between the states in terms of cancer rates. Cancer of larynx incidence in the US is low, even in regions with the highest risk of larynx cancer.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of cancer of larynx?

Dysphonia and dysphagia are the main symptoms of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of larynx. They occur as a result of obstruction of the larynx and are the cause of the obstruction.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for cancer of larynx?

The treatment strategy should consider the tumor stage, the tumor location, the surgical approach, and the post-operative course in terms of quality of life. Postoperative radiotherapy is a common adjuvant treatment in a palliative setting for patients with advanced laryngeal carcinoma. In addition to radiotherapy, chemotherapy is generally indicated for patients with laryngeal carcinoma for palliative therapy and for patients with stage II-IIIB. Toxicity and complications of the chemoradiation therapy are important factors to be addressed in future research.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does vocal-cord radiotherapy improve quality of life for those with cancer of larynx?

Although voice-related symptoms may occur after radio-chemotherapy, patients had no difficulty speaking and experienced improved quality of life compared with patients treated with only surgery. We conclude that radio-chemotherapy is effective for improved voice quality.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is vocal-cord radiotherapy?

Vocal cord function can be improved after radiation therapy, especially for patients over 60 years with limited laryngeal function. This treatment can improve voice quality and eliminate social rejection as a cause of social anxiety or stress. It is a very safe treatment option for a select population of older adults with long-term symptom control.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the primary cause of cancer of larynx?

The most common primary tumor found in larynx with the most frequency were found to be Squamous cell carcinoma (30%), Adenocarcinoma (20%) and Verrucous carcinomas (12%); the most common was Non-melanoma skin carcinoma (10%).

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the survival rate for cancer of larynx?

The prognosis for non-glottic larynx cancers is poor. The most common type of laryngeal cancer, glottic carcinoma, in the USA appears to be more aggressive than reported in other regions.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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