CLINICAL TRIAL

Enoxaparin for Venous Thrombosis

Waitlist Available · < 18 · All Sexes · Rochester, NY

This study is evaluating whether a drug called enoxaparin can reduce the risk of central venous catheter-associated deep venous thrombosis in critically ill children.

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About the trial for Venous Thrombosis

Eligible Conditions
Thrombosis · Deep Vein Thrombosis · Venous Thrombosis

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 3 different treatments. Enoxaparin is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 3 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 2 & 3 and have had some early promising results.

Experimental Group 1
Enoxaparin
DRUG
Experimental Group 2
Enoxaparin
DRUG
Experimental Group 3
Enoxaparin
DRUG

About The Treatment

Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Enoxaparin
FDA approved

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and younger. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
A person who is 36 weeks corrected gestational age or younger and 17 years of age or younger is considered a pediatric patient. show original
The doctor inserted a CVC (central venous catheter) in the internal jugular or femoral vein. show original
, an infiltrate> An infiltrate can form around a central venous catheter (CVC) within 24 hours of insertion. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Maximum of 36 hours after the last dose of enoxaparin
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: Maximum of 36 hours after the last dose of enoxaparin
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Maximum of 36 hours after the last dose of enoxaparin.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
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- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
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Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Enoxaparin will improve 2 primary outcomes and 12 secondary outcomes in patients with Venous Thrombosis. Measurement will happen over the course of Up to removal of CVC (maximum of 28 days).

Number of children with clinically apparent VTE
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Any VTE, except one that is only diagnosed with the systematic ultrasonographic surveillance.
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Number of children with CADVT
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Thrombus in the central vein where the CVC was inserted that is diagnosed with systematic ultrasonographic surveillance.
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Clinically apparent CADVT
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Any CADVT, except one that is only diagnosed with the systematic ultrasonographic surveillance.
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Number of children with any VTE
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Thrombus in the deep vein of any extremity or PE that is confirmed radiologically
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Any VTE
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Thrombus in the deep vein of any extremity or PE that is confirmed radiologically
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
CADVT
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
Thrombus in the central vein where the CVC was inserted that is diagnosed with systematic ultrasonographic surveillance.
UP TO REMOVAL OF CVC (MAXIMUM OF 28 DAYS)
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Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What causes venous thrombosis?

As a group, women with deep vein thrombosis have a fourfold increased risk of venous thromboembolism compared with men. Deep vein thrombosis may result from hormonal changes that are inherent to the female endocrine system or from factors that influence the clotting of vascular tissue.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for venous thrombosis?

Many patients receive oral therapy such as warfarin, phenprocoumon, or unfractionated heparin for venous thrombosis. For deep venous thrombosis, anticoagulant therapy is often continued indefinitely. Patients may receive prophylaxis after pelvic or thigh fractures and after surgery. The majority of patients may be treated initially with low-molecular-weight heparins rather than warfarin, unless they have a prior history of thrombosis (such as a prior history of venous thromboembolism on one side with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the other).

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is venous thrombosis?

A significant number of symptomatic patients will not receive a diagnosis of VTE (16.9%) because they are discharged, are on oral anticoagulants before hospitalisation, or they are discharged before a post-discharge thromboelastogram is performed or the results are delivered. This creates a high mortality rate during the first few months following the identification of VTE.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can venous thrombosis be cured?

Venous thrombosis can be cured with aspirin if the condition is properly treated, but is not an easy-to-get surgery. The time of operation and the method of operation are important.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get venous thrombosis a year in the United States?

Venous thrombosis occurs at an increased rate in patients with certain health problems. Prevention of venous thrombosis may be increased by screening all women aged 50 years and above at least once before receiving a pregnancy test. More research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis in the treatment of venous thrombosis in women with a high risk of the condition.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of venous thrombosis?

Symptoms of venous symptoms may include pain, swelling and heat in the legs. The lower legs should be examined by a venous stasis ulceration test, which can help in identification of venous disease in the legs.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the latest developments in enoxaparin for therapeutic use?

Enoxaparin is highly effective for VTE prophylaxis. For the treatment of VTE, further studies in more indications are underway. Further clinical trial data might allow the incorporation of enoxaparin into the routine thromboprophylaxis in VTE patients.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does venous thrombosis run in families?

Results from a recent paper do not confirm the hypothesis that deep venous thrombosis in familial members of a thrombophilic family is due to heredity. Additional studies which have been carried out in this direction have not delivered conclusive results. However, the present results do support the hypothesis that thrombophilia influences deep vein thrombosis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the average age someone gets venous thrombosis?

Data from a recent study suggests that there appears to be a gradual decline of thrombosis with age, but the reason for this decline is still not fully understood.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for venous thrombosis?

The majority of patients with venous thrombotic events identified in community clinics who could potentially participate in such a trial were patients aged 65 years or older, smokers, hospitalized, and symptomatic, with at least one risk factor for thrombosis, or having a previous thrombotic event.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Is enoxaparin typically used in combination with any other treatments?

Eptifibatide, sivacaftor, and rivaroxaban were rarely used in combination with apixaban. Eptifibatide was used with other anticoagulant drugs frequently in clinical practice with little evidence to support.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving enoxaparin?

Enoxaparin has been investigated at the doses of 3 to 6 mg daily in trials evaluating the thromboprophylactic efficacy and safety of enoxaparin for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic complications. The majority of these trials evaluated an intermediate-term treatment of 3- to 6-hour duration; no clinical trial has reported a 4- or 16-week therapy.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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