Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
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What Are Hospice Clinical Trials?

Hospice care refers to a type of end-of-life care that is typically provided for patients with a terminal illness. Palliative care research often goes hand in hand with hospice care research, as both focus on caring for patients with serious illnesses.

The goal of hospice care is to provide comfort and support to patients and their families during this difficult time.

Researchers and doctors use clinical trials to test new treatments and approaches to care.

By participating in a hospice clinical trial, patients can access cutting-edge treatments that are not yet widely available, such as new types of radiation. Someone with dementia might be entered into a trial testing a new medication that slows the progression of the disease.

There are many different types of hospice clinical trials, including those that test new drugs, new ways of giving existing drugs, new medical devices, and new approaches to symptom management. 2021: Problematic Opiod Use: was conducted using data and literature to report on the use of opioids in advanced-stage disease and terminally ill patients.

Why Is Hospice Being Studied In Clinical Trials?

Many trials focus on pain reduction, especially for patients with cancer. While the patient may be beyond a cure, hospice care helps individuals to maintain dignity and as much enjoyment as possible in their final weeks or months.

2005: Late Hospice for Cancer patients: study focused on how cancer patients don't enter hospice and benefit from it until the late stages of their disease.

Hospice clinical trials are important because they help us to learn more about how to provide the best possible care for people who are seriously or terminally ill.

2019: a study published in the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine studied the challenges of implementing hospice clinical trials. Results showed that doing an ongoing review of the protocol, accommodating unexpected environmental changes, and using such data to adjust staff recruitment should be part of a successful hospice plan.

How Does Hospice Treatment Work?

During clinical trials, patients and their families will receive care from a team of hospice professionals. This team may include doctors, nurses, social workers, chaplains, and other specialists.

The patient can receive hospice care from the comfort of home or an inpatient facility. During drug trials, medical professionals give drugs as needed to help with symptom management and monitor results.

Researchers often focus on a specific disease for each trial, such as cancer, dementia, or organ failure.

Who Are The Key Opinion Leaders On Hospice Clinical Trial Research?

Dr.Amy S. Kelley, professor and vice chair of Health Policy and Faculty Development at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York

She is a Geriatrician who has practiced for over 20 years after graduating from Weill Cornell Medicine. Some of her end-of-life research has focused on the physical decline while in hospice and financial expenditure associated with it.

Dr. Shannon Freeman, Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Northern British Columbia

Her research focuses on how to optimize palliative and hospice care, with a particular focus on digital health technology. She mostly studies how to close this technology gap with the elderly population in rural Canada.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 31st, 2021

Last Reviewed: November 23rd, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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