Peanut snacks for Weight Gain

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA
Weight Gain+1 More
Peanut snacks - Other
Eligibility
18 - 65
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
Select

Study Summary

Many athletes and military personnel desire weight gain primarily as lean mass to improve performance and effectiveness in military/sport endeavors. While much is known about the energy restriction required to reduce body weight, very little is understood about energy and macronutrients needed to promote healthy gains in body weight and lean mass. Typically, athletes are encouraged to increase calorie intake by ~500 kcal/day with an emphasis on adequate protein and carbohydrate, and judicious inclusion of healthy fat-containing calorically-dense foods, including peanuts and peanut butter. This study proposes to evaluate the effect of a 10-week diet and exercise regimen designed to promote healthy weight gain. This will include increasing energy intake by 500 additional kcal/day (above weight maintenance diet) through daily provision of either peanut-based whole foods/snacks (peanut group) or a similar, high-carbohydrate, peanut-free snack (control group) along with a supervised strength training regimen. Results will serve as an important first step in helping understand the gaps in knowledge related to healthy weight gain, designing better weight gain meal plans, not only in athletes and military personnel, but also in clinical populations where promotion of weight gain is advocated.

Eligible Conditions

  • Weight Gain

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

2 Primary · 3 Secondary · Reporting Duration: 10-min laboratory measurement assessed at the baseline, 3-week, 7-week, and 11-week test sessions.

1-min laboratory measurement assessed at the baseline, 3-week, 7-week, and 11-week test sessions.
Change in Total Body Mass (Weight)
10-min laboratory measurement assessed at the baseline, 3-week, 7-week, and 11-week test sessions.
Change in Lean Body Mass
5-min laboratory measurement assessed at the baseline, 3-week, 7-week, and 11-week test sessions.
Change in Insulin-Like Growth Factor Levels
Change in Testosterone Levels
60-min laboratory measurement assessed at the baseline, 3-week, and 11-week test sessions.
Change in Resting Metabolic Rate

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

No peanut-containing snacks
1 of 2
Peanut snacks
1 of 2
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

32 Total Participants · 2 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Peanut snacks · No Placebo Group · N/A

Peanut snacks
Other
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Peanut snacks · Intervention Types: Other
No peanut-containing snacks
Other
ActiveComparator Group · 1 Intervention: No peanut-containing snacks · Intervention Types: Other

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 10-min laboratory measurement assessed at the baseline, 3-week, 7-week, and 11-week test sessions.
Closest Location: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University · Blacksburg, VA
Photo of virginia 1Photo of virginia 2Photo of virginia 3
2011First Recorded Clinical Trial
1 TrialsResearching Weight Gain
5 CompletedClinical Trials

Who is running the clinical trial?

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityLead Sponsor
108 Previous Clinical Trials
25,502 Total Patients Enrolled
Enette Larson-Meyer, PhDPrincipal InvestigatorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
1 Previous Clinical Trials
15 Total Patients Enrolled

Eligibility Criteria

Age 18 - 65 · All Participants · 6 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
You are interested in gaining 5 pounds of body weight to enhance effectiveness in sport, fitness, or military training/competition.
You are willing to eat 500 kcal/d and weight train 3x/wk for 10 weeks.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.