Treatment for Pain, Postoperative

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR
Pain, Postoperative+2 More
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Pain, Postoperative

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a virtual reality headset and a Fitbit activity tracker can help reduce pain and opioid use after head and neck surgery.

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Eligible Conditions

  • Pain, Postoperative
  • Otolaryngologic Disorder
  • Surgery

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 1 primary outcome and 7 secondary outcomes in patients with Pain, Postoperative. Measurement will happen over the course of Before surgery and at study completion, an average of 10 days.

Day 10
Anxiety
Depression
Sleep Quality
Day 10
Disposition on discharge
Length of hospital stay
Patient experience and satisfaction
Day 10
Mean daily opioid use
Pain scores

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

3 Treatment Groups

VR and Fitbit

This trial requires 80 total participants across 3 different treatment groups

This trial involves 3 different treatments. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

VR and FitbitDaily VR use every 3 hours up to 30 minutes at a time and Fitbit daily step goal of 2,000 steps
VR Only
Device
Daily VR only. Daily VR use every 3 hours up to 30 minutes at a time.
Fitbit Only
Device
Fitbit daily step goal of 2,000 steps.

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: at study completion, an average of 10 days
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly at study completion, an average of 10 days for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
R. L.
Ryan Li, MD
Oregon Health and Science University

Closest Location

Oregon Health and Science University - Portland, OR

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 4 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
The patient plans to have major surgery on their head and neck at OHSU and is expecting to stay for two days or more. show original
The ability to understand the goals of the study and the willingness to sign a written informed consent document are both necessary for participating in a study. show original
People aged between 18 and 89 years old. show original
English speaking

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can pain, postoperative be cured?

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The study confirmed a negative correlation between the level of perceived pain, before surgery, and the postoperative pain. The study showed no relationship between the surgery pain and the level of perceived pain.

Unverified Answer

How many people get pain, postoperative a year in the United States?

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Approximately 14 million adults have some form of post-surgical pain in the United States a year. Postoperative pain may be associated with longer hospital length of stay post-surgery.

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What is pain, postoperative?

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Some patients are in pain after breast surgery. If you are looking to join a tinnitus clinical trial, see the tinnitus power review. Once the condition has been characterized, power can help find the most recent and best trials by condition, treatment, or location.

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What are the signs of pain, postoperative?

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Pain is not just pain. There are many causes of pain and some signs may be more likely to be attributable to specific types of pain. The onset of pain should therefore be considered as well as the likelihood of the condition being the same kind of pain in future.

Unverified Answer

What causes pain, postoperative?

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In the first 8 weeks postoperatively, postoperative [chronic pain](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/chronic-pain) depends on a variety of factors, including the type of surgery, the type of anesthesia technique, and surgical techniques. Future research on pain is expected to look into the use of preemptive and preemptive analgesia techniques tailored to the type of surgery and the type of anesthetic used to prevent postoperative pain.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for pain, postoperative?

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A significant percentage of individuals who present with pain, post-surgical in-trauma, are managed through outpatient/partial hospitalization, thus having relatively short admission lengths compared to those experiencing chronic non-surgical pain. A significant percentage of these individuals receive non-benzodiazepine anti-anxiety agents for peri-operative treatments.

Unverified Answer

What are the common side effects of treatment?

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There are few common side effects experienced by patients during treatment. The most common side effects for both the placebo and the experimental group reported were transient headache, fatigue and dizziness. For the treatment group, the most common side effect was pain. The most common side effects experienced by the control patients were transient pain, nausea, and dizziness. There was no correlation between the reported adverse symptoms and a decrease in analgesia or the duration of postoperative pain. These side effects were not reported on patients who received the sham treatment. Recent findings suggest that the use of a sham is an effective method of reducing a patient's pain during a medical therapy.

Unverified Answer

Does pain, postoperative run in families?

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Pain ran in families. This work underscores the importance of considering the genetic contribution while evaluating the efficacy of the new anti-allodynic therapies for chronic post-operative pain.

Unverified Answer

What is the latest research for pain, postoperative?

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Much of the research for postoperative pain, which should be the scope of a surgeon, has been performed in the mid-1980s. In view of all the recent advances in pain and in surgical anesthesiology, especially with regard to general anesthesia, a reassessment of the current surgical guidelines is appropriate, incorporating these recent data on postoperative pain. [Power (medical device and equipment)\n

Unverified Answer

How does treatment work?

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Pain, postoperative, had no effect on patients' satisfaction with the surgical treatment. The duration of pain on the first postoperative day is not a good prognosis indicator of long-term pain in the first year after total (partial) hip replacement surgery. Postoperative and long-term satisfaction are equally or better indicators of long-term satisfaction after total knee replacement.

Unverified Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating pain, postoperative?

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A more complete understanding of the effects of opioid use on gastrointestinal transit and pain perception by these patients should be evaluated. Clinical research and clinical care should consider assessing the patient's expectations of managing pain and the risks and benefits of analgesic treatment.

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Is treatment safe for people?

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We recommend treating patients who should receive oral treatment with opioids according to the guidelines of The British Association for Neuropathic Pain and [The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) (2010, guidance P3). However, we also recommend that all patients being referred by a specialist to be assessed by a palliative care service when they receive [opioid analgesia (http://www.painmanagement.org.uk/opioids/page17.x), since palliative care is an essential aspect of [relief of suffering]. If, at any stage, a person develops intolerable side effects or ceases treatment, they should inform their GP (generalist) immediately: you may need another opinion from a specialist.

Unverified Answer
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