Treatment for Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung+2 More
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a drug previously shown to be safe and effective in treating a rare form of cancer may also be effective in treating other forms of cancer.

See full description

Eligible Conditions

  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
  • Melanoma
  • Advanced Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 3 primary outcomes and 5 secondary outcomes in patients with Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung. Measurement will happen over the course of Maximum 60 months..

Month 84
Overall Survival
Month 84
Assessment of adverse events to evaluate Safety and Tolerability of ATL001
Assessment of autoimmune adverse events
Assessment of new malignancies
Maximum 60 months.
Disease Assessment for Cancer-related medical resources
Disease Assessment for Duration of Response ( DoR)
Disease Assessment for Progression Free Survival
Disease Assessment for Time to first subsequent anti-cancer therapy

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

1 Treatment Groups

Control

This trial requires 90 total participants across 1 different treatment groups

This trial involves a single treatment. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

ControlNo treatment in the control group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: every 4 months to 60 months; then every 6 months until death or until the end of the study, whichever came first, assessed up to 84 months.
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly every 4 months to 60 months; then every 6 months until death or until the end of the study, whichever came first, assessed up to 84 months. for reporting.

Closest Location

H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center - Tampa, FL

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
The patients must be able to comply with the protocol, in the opinion of the investigator. show original
People involved in the study must agree to it in writing by giving their informed consent. show original
Patients who participated in the previous Clinical Trial ATX-NS-001 or ATX-ME-001 are required to have received ATL001. show original

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can carcinoma, non-small-cell lung be cured?

Add answer

This review does not support the idea that cancer can be cured or that it implies good prognosis after cure. The concept of cure of cancer seems based mostly on the belief that a patient has to bear the terrible suffering (which is hardly credible) of this disease.

Unverified Answer

What causes carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

Add answer

The causal factors in lung carcinoma include environmental (including tobacco smoking), genetic (including human hepatitis B virus infection and human papillomavirus infection) and viral factors (including Epstein-Barr virus infection). The causal factors for adenocarcinoma, not squamous cell carcinoma, include smoking (except in adenocarcinoma of the lower respiratory tract); exposure to asbestos; and air pollution. The causal factors for squamous cell carcinoma are environmental (including exposure to arsenic and tobacco smoking) and hereditary (except in the lung). The most significant factor of lung cancer is smoking; if smoking is stopped for at least 5 years, the risk of developing lung cancer drops to 1% per year.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

Add answer

There were only a few (or minority) studies that systematically considered PDE5 inhibitors or TRPV1/2 inhibitors as potential targeted therapy in cancer patients in comparison to drugs targeting the VEGF or EGFR receptor protein complexes. There are a number of studies currently in progress looking in this direction.

Unverified Answer

What is carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

Add answer

Nearly 1/4 of the United States population over the age of 20 suffers from a lung cancer in that year. The incidence of lung cancer increases to nearly 1/3 by the age of 50. Non-smokers are about 10 times more likely to develop lung cancer than smokers. Males and females are equally affected. The number of people with lung cancer has been increasing at a rapid rate (about 6% per year). Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer (70% in non-smokers).

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

Add answer

Signs of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung may include weight loss and trouble eating. Other signs and symptoms can include cough, hemoptysis, or shortness of breath. If any of the above signs and symptoms are present, prompt medical referral is necessary.

Unverified Answer

How many people get carcinoma, non-small-cell lung a year in the United States?

Add answer

The incidence of lung cancers among US current smokers (as measured by incidence rates) is approximately 5-fold higher than among US non-smokers (as determined by death rates). The high overall incidence of lung cancer among people with a history of smoking likely reflects both the aging population, and the increased propensity of smokers to develop lung cancer.

Unverified Answer

What is treatment?

Add answer

Patients with lung cancer must receive standard care, which includes chemotherapy, targeted therapy, radiation, and surgical treatment, when feasible, with or without targeted therapies being the preferred choice. In patients with metastatic disease, surgery may be advisable during a second-line treatment. Chemotherapy was the most common single-agent/single-drug regimen; in the second-line treatment setting, bevacizumab was the most often used single-agent/single-drug regimen.

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in treatment for therapeutic use?

Add answer

A substantial proportion of NSCLC patients will not respond to all available treatments. Results from a recent clinical trial of the current trials suggest that a limited number of patients are likely to benefit from the addition of a new investigational targeted cytotoxic agent.

Unverified Answer

How quickly does carcinoma, non-small-cell lung spread?

Add answer

Non-small-cell lung cancer cell metastases occur shortly after primary tumor invasion. Metastases occur sooner in patients who are younger and with high-stage disease. In our small series, prognosis was not significantly different in patients in whom the primary tumor was removed, when metastases were surgically removed only, when metastases were surgically removed combined with adjuvant chemotherapy, or when they received cytotoxic drugs to prevent recurrence. We suggest that chemotherapy should be stopped in those patients after a negative examination of metastases to reduce the likelihood of a recurrence.

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

Add answer

There is little evidence about any specific subpopulation of patients who may benefit from clinical trials. As new data on treatment benefit come out, clinicians will want to take into account other patient characteristics and decide who to offer clinical trials.

Unverified Answer

Has treatment proven to be more effective than a placebo?

Add answer

The findings of this study suggest that this treatment has a more favourable outcome than a placebo. This is in accordance with the clinical practice of treating patients with neuroleptics as monotherapy or in combination with other drugs.

Unverified Answer

What are the common side effects of treatment?

Add answer

The most common side-effects from chemotherapy included mucositis, nausea/vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue/weakness, and a sore throat. Side effects were exacerbated from chemotherapy when patients took antiproliferative medications, particularly from cisplatin. Severe allergic reactions occurred in both patients and controls. It is advisable to inform patients of the potential for severe reactions with neoadjuvant chemotherapy before initiating the treatment.

Unverified Answer
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.