Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) for Abdominal Trauma

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
3
Effectiveness
3
Safety
Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA
Abdominal Trauma+2 More
Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) - DiagnosticTest
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
Select

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a new ultrasound exam can improve the sensitivity of the FAST exam for detecting solid organ injury.

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Eligible Conditions

  • Abdominal Trauma

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

3 of 3
This is further along than 93% of similar trials

Other trials for Abdominal Trauma

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) will improve 4 primary outcomes in patients with Abdominal Trauma. Measurement will happen over the course of 1 Day of exam.

1 Day of exam
Inter-rater reliability
Number of successful exams
Sensitivity of Detecting Solid Organ Injury
Specificity of Detecting Solid Organ Injury

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

3 of 3
This is further along than 85% of similar trials

Other trials for Abdominal Trauma

Trial Design

1 Treatment Group

Non-enhanced FAST exam followed by BEFAST exam
1 of 1
Experimental Treatment

This trial requires 267 total participants across 1 different treatment group

This trial involves a single treatment. Focused Assessment With Sonography For Trauma (FAST) is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 4 and have been shown to be safe and effective in humans.

Non-enhanced FAST exam followed by BEFAST examParticipants in the emergency department with hemodynamically stable blunt abdominal trauma will receive the standard of care Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) exam followed by a Bubble-Enhanced FAST exam.

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 1 day of exam
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 1 day of exam for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
L. O.
Prof. Laura Oh, Associate Professor
Emory University

Closest Location

Grady Memorial Hospital - Atlanta, GA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 4 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Clinical suspicion of intra-abdominal injury
Presentation within 24 hours of injury
Planned CT of the abdomen/pelvis within 24 hours
Ability of patient or legally authorized representative to provide informed consent

Patient Q&A Section

What causes abdominal injuries?

"Many abdominal injuries occur frequently in sport and recreation. Abdominal injuries can arise from sudden movements such as falling and twisting. They can also involve the contact sport of rugby league. The importance of preventing abdominal injuries is emphasised by the fact that up to three-quarters of all footballers have sustained a minor or major injury at some time during their careers. Recent findings identifies the causes of specific injuries, which include excessive alcohol use and drug use." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Can abdominal injuries be cured?

"Gastric and hepatopancreatic injuries are usually healed spontaneously within 4 weeks. Abdominal wall complications requiring wound closure can be treated successfully but surgical mortality is very high. Trauma patients must be observed closely for the development of complications." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is abdominal injuries?

"Acute abdomen is an emergency situation that requires immediate surgical attention. Patients presenting to a Level I trauma center with abdominal injury has a mortality higher than 100%. The mortality in this group of patients, in most cases, can drop to 50% if they receive surgical care promptly. The mortality is influenced by injury pattern such as blunt or penetrating injury, and by the severity of organ dysfunction." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for abdominal injuries?

"Injury to internal organs and other pelvic organs occurs frequently, and there are several widely practiced and debated approaches to treatment. These varied treatments can be categorized into two broad approaches: surgical and nonsurgical. This classification should not be thought of as static and rigid; it only defines the current trend without asserting a single method of treatment as appropriate for various scenarios." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How many people get abdominal injuries a year in the United States?

"About 10 million persons a year are hit by a blunt abdominal trauma and about 10,000 persons have a serious abdominal injury. Mortality is also high (2.1-4.7 million cases per year) and depends greatly on the age and sex of the person involved in the injury." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of abdominal injuries?

"[Abdominal injuries occur with similar alarming frequencies in all age groups and they are associated with both blunt and penetrating trauma. The most common types of injuries are [incidental abdominal injuries and stab wound to the abdomen due to traffic accidents or criminal motives].] Power - the easiest way to find cases that fit your condition. You could also participate in clinical trials by contacting your local medical center or contacting Power." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Has focused assessment with sonography for trauma (fast) proven to be more effective than a placebo?

"Fast is as effective as standard assessment in terms of identifying unstable hemodynamics on abdominal ultrasound scan. The standard ultrasound protocol appears as equally effective in detecting unstable hemodynamic signs compared with the FAST protocol." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating abdominal injuries?

"There were no new discoveries when it comes to treating abdominal injuries. This fact is very important in assessing the current management of these patients." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What does focused assessment with sonography for trauma (fast) usually treat?

"FAST is very accurate for detecting occult bony or abdominal injuries; however, it tends to miss injuries near the spine and the upper extremities. The addition of ultrasound is warranted in patients with non-abdominal injuries who have been evaluated on the basis of high clinical suspicion." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the common side effects of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (fast)?

"[In our study, less than 1% of patients experienced severe adverse events associated with FAST. The main common adverse events are [bone pain and swelling, abdominal pain and bruising, and abdominal or low back pain and musculoskeletal] (https://www.bmj.sk.aa/content/article/fulltext/10.4150/bmj.b29-0339(15)70063-1.xiv)." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Does focused assessment with sonography for trauma (fast) improve quality of life for those with abdominal injuries?

"No significant difference in outcome was noted between FAST and FAST-A groups. FAST-A does not lead to a different outcome compared with FAST in patients with ABIs. Further research is needed to develop a definitive recommendation for focused AUS application in trauma." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in focused assessment with sonography for trauma (fast) for therapeutic use?

"FAST demonstrated the feasibility of this minimally-invasive method to evaluate clinically significant bleeding of the abdominal cavity and to assess the need for immediate surgery with a high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of the computed tomography (CT) scan was higher than fast FAST; however, both methods showed low sensitivity for diagnosing active injury. Further prospective trials are mandatory to assess the generalizability of these methods at this point of the clinical development stage. Moreover, more complex investigations are warranted to clarify whether FAST might be useful for determining the correct surgical approach in the case of intra-abdominal malignancy." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
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