Treatment for Breast Cancer

1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, IL
Breast Cancer+1 More
Eligibility
< 65
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Breast Cancer

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a combination of interleukin-2 and filgrastim can stimulate the immune system and stop cancer cells from growing.

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Eligible Conditions

  • Breast Cancer
  • Breast Neoplasms

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

1 Treatment Groups

Control

This trial requires 36 total participants across 1 different treatment groups

This trial involves a single treatment. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

ControlNo treatment in the control group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: up to 5 years
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly up to 5 years for reporting.

Closest Location

University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences Center - Chicago, IL

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 65 and younger. You must have received 1 prior treatment for Breast Cancer or the other condition listed above. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
treated with thoracentesis within 2 weeks prior to study entry ECOG performance status of 0-2 DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS: Histologically confirmed advanced breast cancer not eligible for (or patient refuses participation in) a higher priority phase III SWOG study Local stage IIIB/IV disease, i.e. show original
PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS: Age: Under 65 Performance status: SWOG 0 or 1 Hematopoietic: Absolute neutrophil count at least 1,500/mm3 Platelet count at least 100,000/mm3 Hemoglobin at least 9.0 g/dL Hepatic: Bilirubin no greater than 2.0 mg/dL ALT/AST no greater than 2 times normal Renal: Creatinine no greater than 1.5 mg/dL OR Creatinine clearance at least 60 mL/min Cardiovascular: Left ventricular ejection fraction at least 45% on MUGA No angina No history of myocardial infarction Exercise stress test without definite ischemia required for: History suggestive of coronary disease Diabetes mellitus Hypertension Age over 50 Pulmonary: FEV1 greater than 60% of predicted or greater than 2.0 liters DLCO greater than 60% of predicted Other: No prior hemorrhagic cystitis No active systemic infection No active CNS disease (e.g., seizures) HIV negative No second malignancy within 2 years except: Localized nonmelanomatous skin cancer Carcinoma in situ of the cervix Not pregnant or nursing
PRIOR CONCURRENT THERAPY: Biologic therapy: Not specified Chemotherapy: See Disease Characteristics At least 4 weeks since chemotherapy and recovered No more than 2 different prior chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease No prior mitomycin or nitrosourea Lifetime cumulative doxorubicin dose less than 350 mg per square meter Endocrine therapy: Not specified Radiotherapy: At least 2 weeks since radiotherapy and recovered Surgery: At least 3 weeks since major surgery and recovere

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are common treatments for breast cancer?

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Nearly two thirds of women with breast cancer experience no treatment after receiving the information and education that is an important part of standard care for breast cancer. It is important that physicians, nurse practitioners, and oncology nurses use evidence-based treatment strategies.

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What causes breast cancer?

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Although there are differences among the different groups, there are enough similarities to suggest a single basic cause for all breast cancers. This has not been established but is hypothesized to be an infectious agent or a physical risk factor such as environmental toxins. Breast cancer can occur at any age, but the disease remains uncommon among young girls.

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What are the signs of breast cancer?

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Breast cancer can cause pain, swelling, or redness in the breast. Also, breast cancer can cause abnormal sensations or bleeding in the nipple or nipple discharge.\n

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How many people get breast cancer a year in the United States?

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The latest available data on the incidence of breast cancer in women in the US show that the age-standardized rates of breast cancer incidence in US women is at its historical peak. This indicates that the underlying cause is not likely to be related to hormonal exposures or family history of breast cancer. However, the actual age-adjusted rate remains substantially higher than the rates for Western European countries.

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What is breast cancer?

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The disease is complex with different staging systems and different prognostic tools. Breast cancers can appear in different ways and can be sporadic, iatrogenic, etc. It is the most common cause of death among women in the USA.

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Can breast cancer be cured?

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Even if patients were to have no symptoms of breast cancer, the disease remains deadly. But if breast cancer is treated successfully, patients can live a normal life, often with no symptoms.

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What is treatment?

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While one might assume that treatment would be a long-lasting therapy, sometimes the treatment is so successful that it does not need to be repeated. There are a few circumstances that may require additional treatments, though some treatments should not be repeated indefinitely as this can lead to a “burden”. Treatments must be understood and managed carefully so as not to be “used up”. Many times treatments will be repeated after “slightly less effective” results because of a “burden” of multiple treatments, as the treatment can wear off. Treatments should be spaced out over several years as well as monitored with follow ups.

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What is the survival rate for breast cancer?

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The five-year OS (survival) rate for those diagnosed with stage I or stage II [breast cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/breast-cancer) was over 90%, while the five-year DSS (disease-specific survival) was approximately 70%. The five-year OS rate for stage III and stage IV breast cancer was not significantly different from stage II cancer. Survival rates vary substantially based upon the stage of breast cancer in patients and the treatment chosen. The five-year OS rates for all stages of breast cancer are the highest of its kind reported in the literature.

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Has treatment proven to be more effective than a placebo?

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Data from a recent study suggest that, at least when chemotherapy is an integral part of care, improvement in outcomes may be better achieved by a treatment that is as effective as possible than through a treatment that may be less effective than possible. In this view the question of whether such gains are necessarily "more" or "better" merits further attention.

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How serious can breast cancer be?

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Women, especially in developing countries, are not aware of the possible health consequences of the diagnosis, the options given by the physicians, or the treatment recommendations. They suffer through unnecessary anxiety and get more unnecessary diagnostic and treatment procedures than the average woman from industrialized countries. In industrialized countries some men can hardly cope with the thought of breast cancer. Physicians should be more careful. The situation is even worse in developing countries where treatment is more expensive and where the social and financial constraints are very strong. The most obvious approach is educating the patients, which is already the case in many institutions where women are being treated. Nevertheless, we should be cautious about the treatment recommendations.

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What is the latest research for breast cancer?

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At this time, many women have never had breast cancer, they have never gone through chemotherapy. The research is evolving. There has been a lot of research that has been happening on breast cancer in the past years and more are being done regularly. Some of the current current research is listed below\n“

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What are the common side effects of treatment?

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The common adverse reactions to adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients are neutropenia, nausea, peripheral edema, fever, fatigue and rash. These symptoms require prompt management with antiemetic drugs. The incidence of serious adverse reactions is low at 14%.

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