Radiation therapy of unresected keloids for Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Keloids

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Keloids+1 More
Radiation therapy of unresected keloids - Other
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Select

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether radiation therapy may be an effective treatment for keloids.

See full description

Eligible Conditions

  • Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Keloids

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Keloids

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Radiation therapy of unresected keloids will improve 1 primary outcome and 1 secondary outcome in patients with Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Keloids. Measurement will happen over the course of 10 weeks.

1 year
Size of keloids
10 weeks
Toxicity of the radiation

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Keloids

Trial Design

1 Treatment Group

Radiation therapy group
1 of 1
Experimental Treatment

This trial requires 15 total participants across 1 different treatment group

This trial involves a single treatment. Radiation Therapy Of Unresected Keloids is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase < 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

Radiation therapy group
Other
Single-institution pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of unresected keloids. The primary endpoint will be toxicity within 10 weeks of follow-up. Secondary endpoints will include cessation of growth or shrinkage of keloids, symptomatic response, and impact on quality of life.

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 1 year
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 1 year for reporting.

Closest Location

Albert Einstein College of Medicine - Bronx, NY

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 5 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Surgical excision of keloid is either contraindicated or patient has declined treatment with surgical excision
Note: patients with keloids that recurred after previous resection are eligible, as long as the current keloid is either unresectable or patient has decline resection.
Age ≥18
Study specific informed consent provided
Clinically diagnosed keloid

Patient Q&A Section

What are common treatments for keloid?

"In the present study, topical antifibroblast and oral anti-fibroblast therapies were found to be effective and safe in the treatment of keloids. In view of the side effects encountered during therapy and lack of consistency of the long-term results seen in the literature, and without knowing the exact mechanisms of the keloids, we consider topical and oral therapies to be of high value in the treatment of keloids and recommend combined use of both in cases where other therapies are ineffective." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Can keloid be cured?

"There is a clear relationship between keloid and psoriasis. This relationship is not necessarily related to the causal factors of the comorbidities. For cosmetic purposes we believe it is possible to manage keloid effectively, however, no clinical evidence was found of keloid cure." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is keloid?

"Keloids are skin conditions that typically develop on the body and are characterized by hard nodules, plaques and scarring. This scarring tends to interfere with blood circulation and cause local discomfort. Keloids can affect people of all ethnic backgrounds but are common among Asians.\n" - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What causes keloid?

"The major cause of keloid is lack of skin immunity. Other factors like age, genetics and occupational exposure can also play a role and the overall picture of the cause of a keloid is more complex than a simple cause and effect relationship." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of keloid?

"Data from a recent study provides the first overview of the signs of keloid, which should help physicians to confirm the diagnosis and treatment of keloid." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How many people get keloid a year in the United States?

"Keloid was found in 12% of American children and 20% of adults. The percentage presenting with keloid-like disease is significantly greater in women in the United States. This finding may be related to the increased exposure of US women to topical agents during pregnancy and/or breast feeding. This is the first report of keloid-like disease of American patients." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating keloid?

"The development of new drugs for keloid seems a lot distant. However, there are some good drugs that have shown promising results. For instance, retinoid can help reduce inflammation and keloid scarring. Additionally, an anti-inflammatory drug such as etanercept also shows promise in the keloid treatment." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is the average age someone gets keloid?

"[The average age people get keloid lesions is 37.8 years old (SD = 5.9), which is much earlier than what has been reported. Older age might suggest an increase in keloid burden as a result of cumulative risk factors like cumulative cumulative lifetime trauma exposures, earlier onset of exposures or time of onset, or increased duration of exposure] (http://www.researchexposergists.com/research/index.php/keloids/keloids-by-age/keloid-over-the-years.) A more recent study has [noted] that keloids are more common in older patients, with an average age of 30 at first symptom onset (SD = 12)." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in radiation therapy of unresected keloids for therapeutic use?

"A new treatment modality for local control of the keloids with high dose radiation therapy using IMRT was presented that gives excellent local control and no serious side effects. Further clinical studies are needed." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Does keloid run in families?

"There is suggestive evidence of strong genetic predisposition to keloid, as indicated by the presence of a positive family history of keloid, and no significant difference in the occurrence of keloid in the two groups." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for keloid?

"There is a substantial discrepancy of keloid patients eligible for clinical trial. Therefore, keloid patients who are not eligible for clinical trials are the one being considered for clinical trials, which can be minimized by improving the communication in the clinical practice." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Is radiation therapy of unresected keloids safe for people?

"Although most patients with keloids treated with radiation therapy develop scars, some patients develop keloid scars. Scar development may be minimized by avoidance of scar enhancing drugs, use of non-irradiated skin, and long-lasting use of a scar-reducing plastic wrap." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
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